Is CBD Non-Psychoactive?

Understanding how cannabidiol (CBD) exerts its myriad effects on human physiology is a work in progress. Thus far, scientists have identified more than 60 different molecular pathways through which CBD operates. It is known, for example, that CBD acts through multiple receptor-independent channels and it also binds to various receptors in the brain, including serotonin 5HT1A (which contributes to CBD’s antidepressant effect), TRPV1 (which contributes to CBD’s anti-psychotic effect), the nuclear receptor PPAR-gamma (regulates gene expression), and the orphan receptor GPR55, among others.

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Brain Science & the Endocannabinoid System

Professor Greg Gerdeman on brain science, the neurobiology of stress, and how the discovery of the endocannabinoid system has liberated cannabis from the drug abuse paradigm. Here is a wonderful interview with Professor Gerdeman with Project CBD:

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3 Things That Happen When You Consume Marijuana And Caffeine At The Same Time

Coffee, tea, and alcohol are probably the most socially-condoned addictions in the Western world. But as smoking a J rapidly becomes almost as normal as a morning cup of joe, many people are doubling-on and combining their low-level vices.

Using THC and caffeine in tandem doesn’t cause the wooziness many people get when they drink and smoke at the same time. But caffeine and THC still work together in surprising, if less-intense, ways.

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Medical Marijuana Decreases Migraines

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According to a new study from researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, patients diagnosed with migraine headaches saw a significant drop in their frequency when treated with medical marijuana.

The study was recently published in the journal Pharmacotherapy, and examined patients diagnosed with migraines and treated with medical marijuana between Jan. 2010 and Sept. 2014. It found the frequency of migraines dropped from 10.4 to 4.6 headaches per month, a number considered statistically and clinically significant. Continue reading